“Historic handshakes”.. Throughout history, some handshakes have become a symbol of peace and hope.


“Historic handshakes” Photos Via by washingtonpost

Munich on Sept. 30, 1938. – Adolf Hitler and Neville Chamberlain

Adolf Hitler, right, shakes hands with England’s Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain in Munich on Sept. 30, 1938. Along with leaders of France and Italy, Chamberlain would later sign the Munich Agreement, which legitimized Nazi Germany’s annexation of the Sudetenland, part of then-Czechoslovakia. AP

Germany, on July 23, 1945. –  Harry Truman, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin

Harry Truman, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin President Harry Truman, center, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, left, and Joseph Stalin of the Soviet Union shake hands in Potsdam, Germany, on July 23, 1945. The triple handshake capped off a series of discussions on how to handle postwar Europe, after the official surrender of Nazi Germany on May 8 of that year. AP

Vienna on June 3, 1961. – John F. Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev

John F. Kennedy and Nikita Khrushchev President John F. Kennedy welcomes Nikita Khrushchev, then premier of the Soviet Union, at the home of the U.S. ambassador in Vienna on June 3, 1961. The handshake kicked off the historic talks between the two leaders, which touched on nuclear disarmament, ongoing conflict in Southeast Asia and ideological disagreements between the two leaders. AP

 Beijing on Feb. 22, 1972 – Mao Zedong and Richard Nixon

Mao Zedong, the leader of the Chinese Revolution and first chairman of the Chinese Communist Party, shakes hands with Richard Nixon, the 37th president of the United States, on Feb. 22, 1972, in Beijing. A staunch anti-Communist throughout much of his political career, Nixon greeted Zedong during his first official visit to China. AFP/Getty Images

Israeli on Nov. 20, 1977. – Menachem Begin and Anwar Sadat

Menachem Begin, left, the founder of the Likud Party and sixth prime minister of Israel, shakes hands with Anwar Sadat, the third president of Egypt, in the halls of the Israeli Knesset on Nov. 20, 1977. Sixteen months later, on March 26, 1979, in Washington, Israel and Egypt signed their historic peace treaty, making Egypt the first Arab nation to recognize the Jewish state. Getty Images

Geneva on Nov. 19, 1985. – Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev

Ronald Reagan, the 40th president of the United States, first shook hands with Mikhail Gorbachev, the last head of state for the former USSR, at a summit in Geneva on Nov. 19, 1985. The embrace signaled a warming of relations between the longtime Cold War foes. In this photo, Reagan reaches across the table to shake Gorbachev’s hand while sitting at the negotiating table during the Moscow Summit Conference on June 1, 1988, days after Reagan declared that the Cold War had ended. Doug Mills / AP

European Management Symposium on Feb. 2, 1986, – Andreas Papandreou and Turgut Ozal

Greek Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou, left, and Turkish Prime Minister Turgut Ozal shake hands at the European Management Symposium on Feb. 2, 1986, a conference that would eventually become the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Relations between the two nations had been hostile ever since Greece won its independence from the Ottoman Empire in 1821. Prior to the handshake, the two nations had fought in four contemporary wars. World Economic Forum via Wikimedia Commons

Cape Town on May 4, 1990. – Nelson Mandela and F.W. de Klerk

Nelson Mandela, right, the first president of South Africa to be elected in a wholly universal election, and F.W. de Klerk, the last president of apartheid-era South Africa, shake hands in Cape Town on May 4, 1990, after the historic “talk about talks” between the two parties. The conversation paved the way for ending decades of white-minority rule in the country. Rashid Lombard / AFP/Getty Images

White House on Sept. 13, 1993. – Yitzhak Rabin and Yaseer Arafat

Yitzhak Rabin, left, the prime minister of Israel, and Yasser Arafat, leader of the Palestine Liberation Organization, shake hands in front of a jubilant crowd on the White House lawn on Sept. 13, 1993. With President Bill Clinton looming in the background, the shake was the first ever in public by the two leaders, capping off peace talks between Israel and the Palestinian territories. Despite the relative optimism, the agreement never came to fruition. Ron Edmonds / AP

Throughout history, some handshakes have become a symbol of peace and hope.

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